Report: Labour Secretly Suspended Dozens of Members for anti-Semitism and Racism in Last Two Months

Up to 20 party members were suspended in last two weeks alone, Telegraph reports, but only 13 suspensions were made public since October.

Send in e-mailSend in e-mail
Send in e-mailSend in e-mail
Britain's Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn gives a speech on Britain's membership of the European Union in London, April 14, 2016.
Britain's Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn gives a speech on Britain's membership of the European Union in London, April 14, 2016.Credit: Stefan Wermuth, Reuters
new-hdc-logo
Haaretz

Over 50 members of the British Labour Party have been suspended over anti-Semitic and racist remarks over the last two months, the Telegraph reported on Monday, nearly 40 more than publicly admitted by the party. 

Labour suspended up to 20 members in the last two weeks alone, according to the report, which cited an unnamed senior source within the party, who added that the suspensions made public were just the "tip of the iceberg."

A string of anti-Semitism scandals has been bedeviling the Labour Party, reaching an apex last week with the suspension of two prominent party members, including former London Mayor Ken Livingstone. Only 13 party members suspended for anti-Semitism and racism have been publicly named by the party since October.

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn had initially insisted that his party has no anti-Semitism problem, but has since launched an inquiry into the matter and promised to form a "code of conduct" regarding anti-Semitism and racism in general. 

According to the Telegraph, the Labour's compliance unit, the body responsible for vetting members and possibly suspending them for "bringing the party into disrepute," has been struggling to cope with the influx of new members from the far-left which followed Corbyn's election.

Also on Monday, the party suspended three members within seven hours for alleged anti-Semitic posts on Facebook and Twitter. One suggested the "Zionism game" was behind ISIS, another called on Israeli Jews to be relocated to the U.S. and the third compared an Israeli former Premier League soccer player to Hitler.

The president of the Board of Deputies of British Jews, Jonathan Arkush, criticized Corbyn's failure to accept that his party has a widespread anti-Semitism problem, calling it "an issue in itself." Arkush also called on the party to consider a "stronger mechanism" for weeding out members suspected of anti-Semitism.

Click the alert icon to follow topics:

Comments