Refreshing Salads for Your Summer Table

Salad is quick, easy to prepare and generally healthful. Haaretz's top food writers bring you 15 exotic salads.

Limor Laniado Tiroche

Whether it's the opening act, the sidekick to your main dish, or the main event itself, there's nothing quite like a good salad. Haaretz has compiled some of our favorite and most refreshing recipes, just in time for the start of summer.

New riffs on Tabbouleh: Traditional Galilean tabbouleh; Japanese tabbouleh; chocolate and grapefruit tabbouleh

The Arabs call it wheat burghul, in English it is known as bulgur, and it’s wonderful for making all kinds of salads. Honor the ancient harvest of our forefathers with these modern interpretations of tabbouleh salad. Recipes by Hedai Offaim. Get the recipes here.

Galilean tabbouleh; Japanese tabbouleh (Dan Peretz)

Cauliflower, red onion and tahini salad

This salad is a variation of a classic Palestinian salad of cauliflower and tahini. Sumac is available at Middle Eastern and kosher markets and at special spices stores. Recipe by Vered Guttman. Get the recipe here.

Cauliflower, red onion and tahini salad. (Vered Guttman)

Watermelon, feta and pumpkin seed salad

This refreshing summertime combination of watermelon and salty cheese is popular in Bulgaria and also among the Bulgarian Jews in Israel. It's great by itself, as a snack, or served next to grilled or poached fish. Recipe by Vered Guttman. Get the recipe here.

Watermelon, feta and pumpkin seed salad. (Vered Guttman)

Moroccan carrot salad

A classic Moroccan dish with a little twist: tamarind paste, for extra intense flavor. Recipe by Vered Guttman. Get the recipe here.

Moroccan Carrot Salad (Vered Guttman)

Tuna salads: Tunisian tuna salad; tuna and za'atar salad; American tuna salad

These terrific tuna salads are a perfect fit for your summer picnic basket. Recipes by Hedai Offaim. Get the recipe here.

Tuna salads (Dan Peretz)

Middle Eastern fattoush salad

From Gaza to Lebanon, nearly every Arab chef makes fattoush, a simple vegetable salad from the Levant that makes use of dried, toasted or fried pieces of pita bread for added body and flavor. Here you can find a traditional and a not-so-traditional version. Recipes by Vered Guttman. Get the recipe here.

Old-fashioned fattoush salad. (Vered Guttman)

Grilled vegetable salad

Use any good-looking vegetables for this salad: red onion rings, peppers, asparagus, and sliced fennel all work well. You can serve the grilled veggies next to a T-bone steak, boneless-skinless chicken thighs (Israelis’ favorite) or even a hot dog. It will be the star of the meal. Recipe by Vered Guttman. Get the recipe here.

Grilled vegetable salad. (Vered Guttman)

Root vegetable salad on goat cheese crostini

Some of these vegetables are usually eaten cooked, but they're just as tasty eaten raw, especially with goat cheese. Recipe by Vered Guttman. Get the recipe here.

Root vegetable salad on goat cheese crostini. (Vered Guttman)

Beet, black lentil and tahini salad

Color it crimson. The beets provide a unique blend of delicate sweetness and earthy flavor. Recipe by Limor Laniado Tamor. Get the recipe here.

Beet, black lentil and tahini salad. (Limor Laniado Tiroche)

Fresh cauliflower and caramelized pecan salad

This recipe combines sweet and sour flavors with a hint of the Far East. Broken up into little florets, cauliflower can be enjoyed raw. Recipe by Doram Gaunt. Get the recipe here.

Fresh cauliflower and caramelized pecan salad. (Doram Gaunt)