NYC Offers a Model for Dealing With Hate Crime, Mayor De Blasio Says

Mayor called on European governments to provide 'visible, forceful, and consistent protection' of the Jewish community.

AP

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, speaking at a local synagogue, called his city's law enforcers a model for how Europe should react to hate-related attacks, media reports say.

“We know how to call a hate crime a hate crime," the mayor said, quoted by the website JP Updates.

"We know how to say when there’s an act of anti-Semitism. We know how to gather the whole community in defense of the Jewish community. We know what an energetic police response looks like. We know what visible protection of Jewish community sites looks like."

Speaking at Congregation Kehilath Jeshurun on the Upper East Side on Saturday, de Blasio said that in the wake of any Jewish-related attack worldwide, the city's police department vies to protect Jewish and Israeli government sites.

“In this city, we hope that we can provide a positive model,” he was quoted as saying. “It is something we are committed to – and people see it and know it. Our police force has done an outstanding job of protecting the Jewish community writ large, key Jewish centers.

"At any time when there is an attack – we had the tragic attack in Tel Aviv a few days ago, we had the horrendous attack on the synagogue in Jerusalem before that. Each time there’s an attack on the Jewish community anywhere in the world, the NYPD swings into action and reinforces key Jewish community sites and key Israeli government sites in this city.” 

The mayor visited Paris after the recent attacks on the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo and the Hyper Cacher kosher supermarket. Islamist terrorists killed 17 people in those attacks.

He called on European governments to provide "visible, forceful, and consistent protection" of the Jewish community, sending a signal that "no discrimination against the Jewish community will be tolerated and there will be consequences and the community is truly embraced and protected," JP Updates reported.