Dachau Concentration Camp's Notorious Gate Restored After Theft

The gate, bearing the slogan 'Arbeit macht frei,' or 'Work sets you free,' was located in the Bergen area of Norway after authorities received an anonymous tip late last year.

Employees of a transport company carry the gate with the writing "Arbeit macht frei" at the memorial of the former Nazi concentration camp in Dachau, Germany on February 22, 2017. The gate was stolen in 2014 and reappeared in November 2016 near the city of Bergen in Norway.
Sven Hoppe/AP

The wrought iron gate to the Nazis' Dachau concentration camp that was stolen two years ago, prompting an international outcry, has been returned to the German memorial site.

The gate, bearing the slogan "Arbeit macht frei," or "Work sets you free," was located in the Bergen area of Norway after authorities received an anonymous tip late last year.

Bavaria's Culture Minister Ludwig Spaenle called the return of the gate Wednesday an important day for the memorial, German news agency dpa reported.

The gate will not be returned to its original position, where a copy now stands, but will become part of the permanent exhibition where it will be kept inside a glass cabinet equipped with an alarm system.

The concentration camp near Munich was established by the Nazis in 1933.

More than 200,000 people from across Europe were held at Dachau.

About 41,500 Jews, homosexuals, Sinti and Roma, Christian activists and other dissidents were murdered there, according to the Dachau memorial site.

When the camp was liberated by US soldiers on April 29, 1945, some 30,000 prisoners from 31 countries were rescued.