Could a 'Jewish Literary Mafia' Really Control American Publishing?

Even prominent American authors believed for decades that a small Jewish N.Y. clique gets to decide what Americans read. Josh Lambert, author of a book on the subject, offers some insight

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Tzach Yoked
Tzach Yoked
Tzach Yoked
Tzach Yoked

More than 50 years after his death, Jack Kerouac, the man who wrote the iconic novel “On the Road,” is still considered one of the most influential American writers of the 20th century, and one of the most outstanding voices of the Beat Generation. But it turns out that not everyone thought so at the time, according to him. “He would rant for hours about the Jewish literary mafia that he believed had placed a moratorium on publication of his work,” writer Jack McClintock said in a profile of Kerouac in Esquire Magazine, after Kerouac’s death in 1969.

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