Denmark Beefs Up Anti-terrorism Measures After Copenhagen Shootings

Monitoring of Danes joining Islamic militants abroad will be increased and IT capacity will be enhanced.

Send in e-mailSend in e-mail
Danish police marksmen secure shooting victim Dan Uzan's funeral in Copenhagen on Wednesday.
Danish police marksmen secure shooting victim Dan Uzan's funeral in Copenhagen on Wednesday.Credit: Reuters

Denmark's government on Thursday pledged 970 million kroner ($130 million) to strengthen anti-terrorism measures, including by boosting foreign and domestic intelligence gathering.

The announcement follows weekend attacks against a free speech event and a synagogue left two people dead and five wounded in Copenhagen.

The government started drafting the plans last month after lawmakers demanded a review of anti-terror measures following the terror attacks by Islamic extremists in Paris.

Social Democratic Prime Minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt said the plan includes 415 million kroner ($56 million) to boost efforts to monitor Danes joining Islamic militant groups abroad, 200 million kroner for the domestic intelligence agency and 150 million kroner ($20 million) to enhance IT and analysis capacity.

The government also wants more SWAT team members and bodyguards.

"Unfortunately I don't think we ever get done (with fighting terror). The threat is changing all the time," Thorning-Schmidt said.

Denmark tightened its terror legislation in 2002 and 2006, following the 9/11 attacks in the United States in 2001.

The center-right opposition is expected to back the plan.

Saturday's attacks killed Dan Uzan, a member of the Copenhagen Jewish community and volunteer security guard at one of the city's synagogues, and a Danish filmmaker. Five police officers were wounded.

The 22-year-old gunman, Omar Abdel Hamid El-Hussein, was killed by police in a shootout early Sunday.

Danish Defense Minister Nicolai Wammen said Thursday that the M95 assault rifle that El-Hussein used in the first attack had been stolen in late 2013 from the home of a member of Denmark's Home Guard, a volunteer unit.

Click the alert icon to follow topics:

Comments

SUBSCRIBERS JOIN THE CONVERSATION FASTER

Automatic approval of subscriber comments.
From $1 for the first month

SUBSCRIBE
Already signed up? LOG IN

ICYMI

Charles Lindbergh addressing an America First Committee rally on October 3, 1941.

Ken Burns’ Brilliant ‘The U.S. and the Holocaust’ Has Only One Problem

The projected rise in sea level on a beach in Haifa over the next 30 years.

Facing Rapid Rise in Sea Levels, Israel Could Lose Large Parts of Its Coastline by 2050

Tal Dilian.

As Israel Reins in Its Cyberarms Industry, an Ex-intel Officer Is Building a New Empire

Queen Elizabeth II, King Charles III and a British synagogue.

How the Queen’s Death Changes British Jewry’s Most Distinctive Prayer

Newly appointed Israeli ambassador to Chile, Gil Artzyeli, poses for a group picture alongside Rabbi Yonatan Szewkis, Chilean deputy Helia Molina and Gerardo Gorodischer, during a religious ceremony in a synagogue in Vina del Mar, Chile last week.

Chile Community Leaders 'Horrified' by Treatment of Israeli Envoy

Queen Elizabeth attends a ceremony at Windsor Castle, in June 2021.

Over 120 Countries, but Never Israel: Queen Elizabeth II's Unofficial Boycott