British Village's Hitler Sign Sparks Jewish Outrage

Cornish village officials say Hitlers Walk park is part of local history, but Jewish community threatens boycott until sign removed.

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Haaretz
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Mevagissey
MevagisseyCredit: Wikicommons
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Haaretz

A park in a small British village is at the center of a controversy between village officials and the Jewish community, after a sign reading "Hitlers Walk" has been reinstated at the park's entrance.

The sign was taken down in 2005 following complaints, but has been recently put up again by the Mevagissey Parish Council, saying that Hitlers Walk, without an apostrophe, is what locals call the park, BBC reported.

Supporters of the reinstatement of the sign say it has nothing to do with Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler, and that the park was named in the 1930s after a local councilor nicknamed "Hitler" due to his overtly officious style.

Parish councilor John Daniel, who supported the decision to put the sign back up, says opposition to the sign is the result of "political correctness gone mad."

"The name goes back to a time before the war when whoever was in charge of the park was a bit authoritarian. I am 80 and I have always known it as Hitlers Walk. All the local people have known it as Hitlers Walk and they wanted it back. It's not offensive, it's just what local people call it," he told the BBC.

Harvey Kurzfield, of Kehillat Kernow, which represents the Jews of Cornwall, urged Jews to boycott the village until the sign is removed.

"I think it's outrageous and completely unfeeling. It is unbelievable to stoop to doing something like that," he told the BBC.

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