U.S. National Archives Releases Trove of Info on Shanghai's Holocaust Refugees

The U.S. National Archives is making available visa application records from the U.S. consulate in Shanghai, a potential trove of information about Holocaust refugees.

JTA
JTA
Send in e-mailSend in e-mail
In this April 24, 1945 photo released by the U.S. National Archives, an American soldier stands among German loot stored in a church at Elligen, Germany
In this April 24, 1945 photo released by the U.S. National Archives, an American soldier stands among German loot stored in a church at Elligen, GermanyCredit: AP
JTA
JTA

The U.S. National Archives is opening to researchers postwar visa application records from the U.S. consulate in Shanghai, a potential trove for information about Holocaust refugees in that city.

"This collection adds to the extensive Holocaust-related records holdings at the National Archives," according to a Nov. 20 statement from the archives.

"From 1938 on, an estimated 20,000 Jewish refugees from Germany and Austria escaped to Shanghai, the only place in the world that did not require a visa to enter," the statement said. "Between 1939 and 1940, nearly 2,000 Polish Jews escaped to Shanghai, avoiding certain death."

The 1,300 case files for applicants for U.S. visas covers the period 1946-1951 and could provide a window into the postwar movements of the refugees.

In addition to Jewish refugees, the city hosted diasporas from an array of war-battered countries.

Click the alert icon to follow topics:

Comments

SUBSCRIBERS JOIN THE CONVERSATION FASTER

Automatic approval of subscriber comments.
From $1 for the first month

Already signed up? LOG IN

ICYMI

Charles Lindbergh addressing an America First Committee rally on October 3, 1941.

Ken Burns’ Brilliant ‘The U.S. and the Holocaust’ Has Only One Problem

The projected rise in sea level on a beach in Haifa over the next 30 years.

Facing Rapid Rise in Sea Levels, Israel Could Lose Large Parts of Its Coastline by 2050

Prime Minister Yair Lapid, this month.

Lapid to Haaretz: ‘I Have Learned to Respect the Left’

“Dubi,” whose full name is secret in keeping with instructions from the Mossad.

The Mossad’s Fateful 48 Hours Before the Yom Kippur War

Tal Dilian.

As Israel Reins in Its Cyberarms Industry, an Ex-intel Officer Is Building a New Empire

Queen Elizabeth II, King Charles III and a British synagogue.

How the Queen’s Death Changes British Jewry’s Most Distinctive Prayer