Israel Asks Indian Officials to Have 'Hitler' Clothing Shop Renamed

Israel's consul general to the city of Mumbai says she tried to explain to state officials 'how grave and serious the issue is.'

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Israel has complained to the Indian state of Gujarat about a menswear shop there named ''Hitler."

Israel's consul general to the city of Mumbai, Orna Sagiv, says she asked state officials Monday to intervene to help get the store's name changed.

She said she tried to explain to them "how grave and serious the issue is."

The shop opened last month with a huge sign reading ''Hitler" and a Nazi swastika inside the dot in the letter ''i."

The owner said he didn't know about Hitler's history when the name was suggested by his partner, whose stern grandfather was nicknamed Hitler.

The Nazi dictator who led the extermination of Jews in World War II Europe is a subject of routine fascination in India.

Indians walk past a shop named 'Hitler' in Ahmadabad, India, Aug. 29, 2012.Credit: AP
Rajesh Shah, one of the owners of a store named Hitler, prepares a bill for a customer in Ahmadabad, India, Aug. 29, 2012.Credit: AP
Indians walk past a shop named 'Hitler' in Ahmadabad, India, Aug. 29, 2012.Credit: AP

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