Polish Thug on Trial for pro-Hitler Book May Have Judge on His Side

Best known for his exploits in the soccer stands, Roman Z. is now facing charges for penning a book titled 'How I Fell in Love with Adolf Hitler.'

Dreamstime

Proceedings in the trial of Roman Z. began in Wroclaw on Wednesday. He is a recognized thug, known for his unruly behavior in soccer stadiums. However, this time he is facing charges not for disturbing the peace, but for writing a book called “How I Fell in Love with Adolf Hitler.”

Yet despite the fact that this work is replete with anti-Semitic expressions and disparaging comments about homosexuals, blacks and anyone who is not a pure Polish Catholic, and despite the fact that the prosecution is charging him with dissemination of fascist propaganda and hatred of foreigners, the presiding judge, according to the newspaper Gazeta Wyborcza, noted at the outset that he will try to acquit him. The judge, according to the newspaper, will try to base his decision on the testimony of a linguistic expert who read the text and did not reach an unequivocal conclusion.

The book is published online. The back cover shows Z. in Nazi uniform, along with his credo: “I am a declared anti-Semite, at least from the moment I met my Jewish acquaintances. I support race theories ever since I crossed my country’s borders. Before that I didn’t.”

In his book he calls Hitler “my sun,” expressing surprise that Poles didn’t join him on his march towards Moscow. In chapters labeled “Poland is not lost as long as there are no blacks and Arabs here,” and “The Jew, an enemy of Poles,” Z. freely expresses his xenophobia. The issue of Jews constantly recurs. He claims that the ‘Jewish problem’ exists but is concealed by the government. He exonerates the farmers of Jedwabne who burned their Jewish neighbors and stole their possessions during the war, and questions the contention that 6 million Jews were killed in Auschwitz.

Z. also expresses admiration for Hitler for killing homosexuals and pedophiles, thus saving Germany from AIDS (even though the virus was only discovered in the 1980s.)

If the judge indeed acquits the accused and the prosecutor does not file an appeal, soccer fans will soon see the man create another incident in some stadium.