Tourist Tip #352 / InDNegev Music Festival

This local version of Lollapalooza runs from October 10-12 and showcases more than 80 gigs. But buy your ticket in advance, or don't bother to go.

The U.S. has Lollapalooza, Coachella and South by Southwest, England has the Glastonbury festival – and Israel has InDNegev, the three-day alternative music bonanza that has drawn thousands of Israelis to the desert in recent years.

This year the event runs from October 10-12 and showcases more than 80 gigs from homegrown indie musicians and performers, all set against a desert backdrop.

Festival organizers say this year's lineup includes one-off collaborations and an array of cultural and artistic happenings. But, as in the past, the real focus is on the live music: Folk, blues, rock, electronic and experimental sounds performed on two stages.

There's also a new space called InDtronix – a new "electronic compound" to spotlight the work of Israeli artists and producers working in different genres. The indie university radio station Kol Hacampus is presenting a special project, as are the beats-centric label Raw Tapes and Jerusalemite collective Miklataklitim, which releases everything from hip-hop to noise to electronic to indie rock.

Kids can play in a special area set up especially for them, and there's also a "Shabbat compound" that offers workshops, classes, prayer sessions and communal meals aimed at bringing people together over the Sabbath.

The festival takes place in Mitzpe Gvulot, in southern Israel (about an hour and a half from Tel Aviv and some 35 minutes from Be'er Sheva).

Be sure to bring supplies and prepare to camp out. There are on-site toilets and showers and there's food to be had as well, although lots of festival-goers bring their own grub and cook it up there.

Tickets cost NIS 270 for all three days, or NIS 120 for Thursday alone. They can be bought online or via phone at (03) 544-9345.

Note: Tickets will not be sold at the festival itself – so, if you're interested, get your hands on them now before it's too late.

Daniel Tchetchik
Daniel Tchetchik