The Israelis Making Sure Your Vacuum Cleaner Won't Spy on You

A small select group of cyber experts seek out weak points in digital systems, and warn: 'With devices that have cameras, the invasion of privacy is more dangerous'

Amitai Ziv
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A few months ago, cyber company Checkmarx revealed a frightening vulnerability in a particular robovac model. The flaw enabled an attacker to seize control of the robovac remotely and turn it into a spy camera, and use it to map out its owner’s home.

“Every time we, as users, connect remotely via our smartphone to such a device [like a robovac], we open a back door to our home network and all the devices connected to it,” said Erez Yalon, head of research at Checkmarx, when the incident occurred. “With devices that have cameras, the invasion of privacy is more dangerous.”