Grab Your Protective Lenses: 'Ring of Fire' Solar Eclipse Visible From Israel

For those who don't want to risk irreparable eye damage, the Israel Space Agency is livestreaming the astronomical event from its Facebook page

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Children watch a solar eclipse through protective glasses at the Hebrew University campus in Jerusalem, June 6, 2012.
Children watch a solar eclipse through protective glasses at the Hebrew University campus in Jerusalem, June 6, 2012.Credit: Shiran Granot

Israel is witnessing a solar eclipse on Sunday – the last one Israelis will be able to view until 2027.

The eclipse will be visible over Israel between 7:26 A.M. and 9:30 A.M., reaching its peak at 8:24 A.M., when the moon would hide approximately 35 percent of the sun’s surface. It will also be seen over the southern parts of the Arabian Peninsula, eastern and central Africa, Pakistan, northern India and China, according to NASA.

A solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes between the Earth and the sun, partially or fully hiding the sun. Sunday’s eclipse will not be full one, but partial, also known as a “ring of fire.”

Watching the sun during an eclipse without protective gear could cause irreversible eye damage. The Israel Space Agency warns of watching the sun directly or through telescopes or binoculars aimed directly at the sun. Anyone who wants to view the phenomenon will need solar viewing glasses.

In honor of the event, the Science Ministry’s Israel Space Agency and the Israeli Astronomical Association will hold guided viewings open to the public, and the association will also broadcast the eclipse live from its observatory in the central city of Givatayim.

Anyone who finds themselves without protective lenses can watch the eclipse on the Israel Space Agency's Facebook page. The Ilan Ramon Druze Space Center in Yarka, in northern Israel, will also hold a viewing event for the public, free of charge.

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