Rank & File: Hundreds Mark Queen Elizabeth II's 90th Birthday in Ra'anana

Teens with family suffering from cancer enjoy rock-climbing center; asylum-seekers in Tel Aviv enjoy mural-painting project.

Teens participating at the Jeremy’s Circle rock climbing day at Boulderland in Kfar Sava.
Yitzhak Feigenbaum

HARD CLIMB: Since former New Yorker Pamela Becker founded Jeremy’s Circle in memory of her husband, who was struck down by cancer, the organization has provided fun events to children who have a family member suffering the disease. On Monday it was the turn of nearly 40 teenagers to enjoy Boulderland, a rock-climbing center in Kfar Sava. “It was something that for most of the kids was a first-time experience,” Jeremy Circle’s director, Cleveland native Yitz Feigenbaum, told Haaretz. “It’s not something parents have time for. It was very successful.” Susan Wilner, who also hails from New York and organizes most of the events, explained that rock climbing is an opportunity for teens to meet each other and do interesting things that families dealing with cancer “don’t have money to spare for.” Volunteer Rochelle Shalet organized the Boulderland visit.

GETTING ON ROYALLY: Hundreds of guests gathered in Ra’anana Park on Wednesday evening to celebrate Queen Elizabeth II’s 90th birthday. With mini fish ‘n’ chip wrappings and Beatles songs in the background, British Ambassador David Quarrey and his partner Aldo Henriquez hosted over 1,000 guests. He remarked that besides celebrating his country’s longest-serving monarch, “We are celebrating another year of the friendship and partnership between our two countries,” Quarrey noted: “We saw Rolls Royce sign Britain’s biggest-ever export deal to Israel. We saw more of Britain’s biggest companies – Barclays, HSBC, BT, RBS – expanding their operations in Israel. And we saw the U.K. become Israel’s number one export market in Europe.”

ELEPHANTS FOR PEACE: When Julie Fisher, wife of U.S. Ambassador to Israel Dan Shapiro, heard that members of U.S.-based Artolution, which brings the world’s communities in conflict together through art, was in Israel, she quickly arranged to have the group’s co-founders organize a mural-painting project at the Unitaf kindergarten in Tel Aviv’s Hatikva neighborhood. Fisher told Haaretz that as president of the Diplomatic Spouses Club, which supports the project that provides daycare to children of asylum seekers, she thought the project would be perfect because the kindergarten had suffered vandalism by neighbors. Artolution’s Max Frieder, originally from Denver, and Joel Bergner, from Chicago, met with teachers and kids, who picked the theme of elephants to represent strength, she said, and together they completed the project in one day.”I heard the next day they were so excited to see this,” Fisher added.

Rank and File was compiledby Steven Klein.

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