Netanyahu to Britain's May: There Should Be 'Zero Tolerance' for Chemical Weapons

'Assad must understand that when he allows Iran and its proxies to establish a military presence in Syria, he is endangering both Syria and the stability of the entire region'

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May meets with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Downing Street, London, February 6, 2017.
Peter Nicholls / אי־פי

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu told British Premier Theresa May there should be "zero tolerance for the use of non-conventional weapons," the Prime Minister's Office said Sunday.

The two spoke in a phone call Saturday following the U.S.-led strike on Syria, which was a retaliation for the chemical attack in the Syrian town of Douma attributed to the Assad regime.

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In the phone call, Netanyahu stressed to May that Iran is the main element destabilizing the Middle East and that "President Assad must understand that when he allows Iran and its proxies to establish a military presence in Syria, he is endangering both Syria and the stability of the entire region."

The joint strike by the U.S., France and U.K. attacked military bases, research facilities and a chemical weapon storage facility in Syria. Following the attack, Russia said there would be "consequences."

On Saturday, Russia called for an emergency meeting of the UN Security Council to discuss the attack. The council overwhelmingly rejected a Russian resolution calling for condemnation of "aggression" by the U.S., U.K. and France against Syria. Russia's demand for condemnation and an immediate halt to "aggression" and "any further use of force" by the three Western allies got support from only two other countries on the 15-member Security Council — China and Bolivia.