Netanyahu Family Spokesman: No-one Is Mentally Healthier Than Sara Netanyahu

Nir Hefetz told Channel 2 that the prime minister's wife did nothing criminal and that the authorities were just being pressured to pursue a case against her to get her husband.

Sara Netanyahu and her husband, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, May 2015.
Amos Ben Gershom/GPO

Conversations between private lawyers and the attorney general are common, Netanyahu family spokesman Nir Hefetz said Friday, following the news that the family's lawyer Jacob Weinroth contacted Attorney General Yehuda Weinstein, asking him to close the case against Sara Netanyahu.

In an interview on Channel 2's Friday evening news show, Hefetz added that there was no reason to interrogate the prime minister's wife, since she didn't commit any crime. In response to the reports that claimed that Weinroth asked that Netanyahu not be investigated due to her mental state, he said "There is no-one more mentally strong, mentally healthy, with great strength of will, like Sara Netanyahu, which is going through 20 years of shaming. I don't know if a regular person could withstand that."

Turning to the alleged irregularities in the running of the prime minister’s households in Jerusalem and Caesarea, Hefetz claimed that when it came to the affairs of the Netanyahus, the authorities are under pressure of the press and certain 'elites', who are interested in ousting Netanyahu. According to him, if Benjamin Netanyahu wasn't involved, "No-one would have investigated this nonsense, babble, bottle recycling, lame garden furniture set with a table bought in Daliat al-Carmel." According to him, the accusations made against the couple are "baseless," but that even if they weren't they would not have constituted a criminal offence.  

Earlier on Friday, Haaretz reported that Weinstein, who is slated to end his tenure in the end of January, authorized the police to call Sara Netanyahu in for questioning. The Ministry of Justice expressed outrage at Weinroth for asking to meet the attorney general to discuss a private matter and then brought up his clients' case in the end of the meeting. "He simply took us for a ride," a senior official at the ministry said. After that meeting, Weinroth asked to meet with Weinstein again and to discuss the case, but the attorney general refused and suggested that he contact him in writing instead.