In Rare Move, Israeli Military Court Voids Restraining Order Against Right-wing Activist

This is the second time an administrative order against a Jew is overturned by the court in the last decade

The Israeli settlement of Kedumim (illustrative).
JAAFAR ASHTIYEH/AFP

A military appeals court has canceled a restraining order against a right-wing activist West Bank settler for the second time in less than a year. Such a cancelation is extremely rare and the activist’s case is the only known instance of an administrative order against a Jew being overturned by the court since 2008.

Since the hearing that negated the order was held behind closed doors at the Ofer military base, details of it cannot be published. However, The activist’s attorney, Menashe Yadoo of the right-wing Honenu organization, has asked the court to make them public. An earlier order against the activist, who is from a settlement in the northern West Bank, in was canceled last November.

In his decision, military court Judge Zvi Lekah canceled the order that was signed by Central Command commander Maj. Gen. Roni Numa and barred the activist from the West Bank for four months, with the exception of the settlement of Kedumim. The order was issued last week but its execution was delayed at the attorney’s request.

“With its brave decision the court blocked a dangerous administrative order whose issuance conveyed that the army is above the law and the rules of the game,” said Yadoo. “The State of Israel’s Jewish and democratic character is at great risk and this risk is measured in the field by small steps we must cope with every day. We welcome this decision, which is a small but important step in halting this trend.”

“I expect those same Shin Bet coordinators and those people who are pursuing Jews in the settlements every day to atone," said the activist himself, "and deal with Israel’s real enemies who murder Jews every day on the roads of Judea and Samaria,” the biblical names for the West Bank.