Iran Accuses Mossad of Trying to Kill Nuclear Deal

'Incredible series of coincidences. Or, a simple chronology of a Mossad program to kill the JCPOA?' Foreign Minister Javad Zarif tweets

Iran's Foreign Minister Javad Zarif speaks during a news conference in Istanbul, Turkey, October 30, 2018.
\ MURAD SEZER/ REUTERS

Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif accused on Thursday the Mossad of trying to sabotage the nuclear accord it reached in 2015 with world powers.

"Incredible series of coincidences. Or, a simple chronology of a Mossad program to kill the JCPOA?" Zarif tweeted. Attached to the tweet was a picture detailing dates of statements by Netanyahu about Iran's nuclear program and of media reports about Mossad activists to foil attacks in Europe, and how those dates coincide with diplomatic events attended by U.S. President Donald Trump or Iranian President Hassan Rohani.

Zarif offered no details beyond this tweet.

Denmark said on Tuesday it suspected an Iranian intelligence service had tried to carry out a plot to assassinate an Iranian Arab opposition figure on its soil. A Norwegian citizen of Iranian background was arrested in Sweden on October 21 in connection with the plot and extradited to Denmark, Swedish security police said. 

A report said the Mossad had a role in helping foil the attack.

Iran on Wednesday summoned the Danish ambassador to Tehran over Copenhagen's allegations about an Iranian plot to kill an opposition activist in Denmark, the official IRNA news agency reported.

The United States is preparing to impose the new sanctions on Iran’s oil industry after Washington withdrew from a nuclear deal between Tehran and other global powers earlier this year, but is also considering offering waivers to some allies that rely on Iranian supplies.

“We want to achieve maximum pressure but we don’t want to harm friends and allies either,” Bolton said Wednesday in a talk at the Hamilton Society.

Under the law, the U.S. president must periodically issue a “determination” on whether there is su iran fficient supply in the market from non-Iranian sources for countries to significantly cut their Iranian purchases.

The administration’s renewed sanctions are set to come into effect on November 5.

Under U.S. law, Washington can sanction the financial institutions of foreign countries that fail to significantly reduce their purchases of Iranian oil and petroleum products.

The purpose of the law, which came into effect during the Obama administration, was to put pressure on Iran to curtail its nuclear program by forcing its major oil customers to reduce their purchases.

Three of Iran’s five largest buyers of crude - China, India and Turkey - have resisted calls by Washington to end their oil purchases outright.