Four in U.S. Sue Israel for Gaza Flotilla Injuries

The plaintiffs claim they suffered injuries as a result of the 2010 confrontation between the Israeli Navy and those aboard one of the ships.

Israel Navy forces approaching the Mavi Marmara bound for Gaza, May 31, 2010.
Reuters

Four people injured in the Israeli military's 2010 raid on the Gaza flotilla are suing the government of Israel in a U.S. court, the Washington Post reported on Monday.

Three Americans and one Belgian seeking to be compensated for injuries they sustained as a result of the raid filed the suit Monday in Washington.

At the time of the encounter, the four were aboard the Challenger 1, a ship sailing under the U.S. flag that was carrying media equipment and 17 passengers and crew. According to the Washington Post, their attorneys claim that they suffered injuries including partial loss of sight and a broken nose. The plaintiffs say they were restrained for 12 hours and detained for three days before being deported from Israel.

The 2010 confrontation in the Mediterranean Sea between the Israeli Navy and those aboard the Mavi Marmara, which left nine passengers dead, triggered a diplomatic crisis between Israel and Turkey that until today remains unresolved.

The Turkish ships were attempting to break Israel's blockade of the Hamas-controlled Gaza Strip.

In October, the parents of 19-year-old Furkan Dogan, a Turkish national who was among those killed in the raid, sued former Prime Minister Ehud Barak in Los Angeles Federal Court.

A UN panel that investigated the raid found it was "excessive and unreasonable," but also blamed Turkey.

Last month, Israel and Turkey reached an understanding on steps to a reconciliation agreement that would normalize ties and put an end to the five-year-long crisis between the two countries.