Last Round of Eurovision Ticket Sales to Begin Tuesday Evening

Tickets for the Eurovision song contest, which will be held in Israel next month, will range from $56 to $560

Madonna will perform at the Eurovision in Israel, likely with two songs
\ Mario Anzuoni/ REUTERS

Sales of remaining Eurovision tickets will begin Tuesday at 18:00 Israel time, the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and KAN, the Israeli Public Broadcasting Corporation, announced.

In this last installment of ticket sales, ticket prices will range from $56 (for rehearsals of the semi-finals) to $560 for the VIP Green Room (available for the finals only). The EBU and the KAN recommend buying tickets only from the official website only.

In the first round of sales last month, tickets were sold out within one hour. Kan then investigated suspicions of interference in ticket sales. The main suspicion was the Israeli figures in the entertainment industry were given priority over the public. 

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Last week, it was revealed that Madonna will perform in the event. The singer will likely perform two songs – a popular hit and a new song. The pop superstar and the contest's producers have previously butted heads, apparently because the new song she plans to debut contains political messages.

Planning for the contest, which Israel is hosting thank to its victory in last year's, has seen hiccups over international calls for a boycott and funding issues. 

Also last week, the Prime Minister’s Office announced it would cover 1.5 million shekels (about $410,000) of the security costs for the contest.

The announcement came after the song contest's executive supervisor sent Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu a stern letter in which he warned him that Israel's foot-dragging on the matter could impede preparations for the entire event.

In January, former Pink Floyd frontman Roger Waters called on the BBC to refrain from broadcasting the contest. An open letter signed by over 50 leading U.K. artists urged the BBC to push for the locale of this year's song contest to be changed because of "Israel's systematic violation of Palestinian human rights."