Israeli Election: Journalist Caroline Glick Joins Bennett and Shaked's New Party

Glick, who writes for Jerusalem Post and Breitbart, is the latest addition to Hayamin Hehadash

Journalist Caroline Glick attends the Jerusalem Post Annual Conference, New York, April 29, 2018.
Mark Israel Salem

Caroline Glick, Jerusalem Post's deputy managing editor, has joined Hayamin Hehadash, the new party launched by hawkish ministers Naftali Bennett and Ayelet Shaked after they split from Habayit Hayehudi.

Bennett and Shaked said Saturday they were quitting their right-wing party to form a new list that would attract both secular and religious voters ahead of the April 9 election. Another Knesset member from Habayit Hayehudi, Shuli Moalem-Refaeli, has joined them.

>> Read more: Abandoning a lasting brand, Bennett shows he's aiming for the Prime Minister's Office ■ Eyeing end of Netanyahu era, Bennett and Shaked are ditching the settlers

Ahead of the 2015 polls, the U.S.-born controversial columnist had been considered for a spot on Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's Likud party and had publicly supported him. Netanyahu is "the right man to head our government and lead the nation in the coming years," she said in a 2015 Facebook post.

Glick was an assistant foreign policy adviser to Netanyahu during his first term as prime minister, in the 1990s. She founded the right-wing satirical news website Latma in 2009 and served as its chief editor, and has written for the Makor Rishon newspaper and Breitbart, an American right-wing website which is sometimes affiliated with the so-called alt-right movement.

She is a senior fellow at the Center for Security Policy, and during the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq in 2003, she was an embedded journalist in the U.S. Army’s 3rd Infantry Division.

A Chicago native and Columbia and Harvard University alumna, Glick immigrated to Israel in 1991. 

Glick is known as an opponent of the two-state solution. In 2014, she published a book entitled "The Israeli Solution: A One-State Plan for Peace in the Middle East," in which she disputes Palestinian demographic statistics – saying the number of Palestinians living in the West Bank and Gaza Strip are grossly exaggerated.

Glick said she would apply Israeli law to the West Bank, which in her plan would be integrated into Israel along with its Palestinian inhabitants. The plan doesn’t encompass the Gaza Strip because, she has argued, by withdrawing from it in 2005 Israel voided its claim to territory or sovereignty there. “Gaza is an independent state,” she said.