Netanyahu Was Banking on Vaccines to Win Him the Election, but There Are a Few Things He Didn't Account For

The PM’s strategy toward the ultra-Orthodox and Arab communities could yet backfire, while the COVID-19 mutation threatens to imperil his desired timetable for reopening the country

Chaim Levinson
Chaim Levinson
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Chaim Levinson
Chaim Levinson

When Benjamin Netanyahu began campaigning in the run-up to the March 23 election, it looked like a done deal. Benny Gantz’s Kahol Lavan party had fallen apart, Yesh Atid wasn’t gaining momentum, the left wing was divided and battered, and the right wing beyond the prime minister’s Likud was split between Gideon Sa’ar’s New Hope party and Naftali Bennett’s Yamina. The people at Netanyahu’s election headquarters were exuding complacency in the belief that the coronavirus vaccine would win them the election.

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