Israel's Election Is Over, So Now What? The Key Dates to Expect

Here are the anticipated deadlines for each stage to end Israel's political deadlock

Jonathan Lis
Jonathan Lis
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Benny Gantz and President Reuven Rivlin at a memorial for Yitzhak Rabin, Jerusalem, November 10, 2019
Benny Gantz and President Reuven Rivlin at a memorial for Yitzhak Rabin, Jerusalem, November 10, 2019Credit: Emil Salman
Jonathan Lis
Jonathan Lis

With Israel's third election in a year over, another attempt to form a government has begun. Below is the timeline of key events in the upcoming months, including anticipated deadlines for each stage to end Israel's political deadlock. Said dates are subject to change depending on the progression of the process. 

In addition, on an unknown date, the High Court of Justice will decide on a petition seeking to oblige the legal advisers to the government, the Knesset and the President's Residence to submit an opinion on whether Netanyahu should be allowed to lead a government under indictments for corruption, fraud and breach of trust. 

Bibi went gunning for his only real rival

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The Movement for Quality Government in Israel, which filed the petition, sought to issue an interim order to freeze of the president's recommendation process until the legal advisers issue a detailed opinion on the matter.

March 8-9: President Reuven Rivlin is expected to consult with the faction leaders, in order to assign the task of forming a government to one of the candidates. If Netanyahu gains the support of 61 lawmakers by then, he will automatically be assigned to form a government.

March 10: The latest date for the Central Election Committee to publish the final results of the election. The committee was supposed to publish the results no later than eight days following Election Day, but since that date would clash with the Purim holiday next week, the committee's deadline might be delayed or pushed forward.

March 16: The inauguration of the 23rd Knesset.

March 17: The latest deadline by law for the president to assign the task of forming a government to one of the candidates.

April 14: In the case that President Rivlin gives the task to form a government to one of the candidates at the last possible date, the candidate who received the mandate would have to present a government within 28 days, with the possibility for a two-week extension.

April 30: If the first candidate fails to form a government, the president will have a maximum of two days for another round of consultations, after which he may assign the task to the second candidate. The latter will be given 28 days to try to form a government, without extensions.

May 28: If the second candidate also fails to form a government, Knesset members can form a majority and ask the president within 21 days to task another candidate to form a government. That candidate would have two weeks to try and form a government.

June 18: At the latest, unless a government is formed, a fourth election will be declared, with the anticipation that it won't take place before September 2020.

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