Haaretz Journalist Yoel Marcus Wins Sokolow Lifetime Achievement Award

Yoel Marcus honored for 'opinionated, influential, independent and courageous writing' in career spanning 50 years

Haaretz columnist Yoel Marcus, who served the paper in a variety of capacities over more than 50 years, has won the 2017 Sokolow Prize for Journalism, according to the Tel Aviv Municipality, which makes the annual award for journalistic excellence. 

The other winners this year were Yedioth Ahronoth journalist Ronen Bergman, Channel 10’s foreign desk head Nadav Eyal, and Itay Angel, a reporter for Channel 2’s “Uvda” investigative program. 

Marcus, 85, took the lifetime achievement award. The statement announcing his win called him “One of leading columnists in the history of Hebrew-language journalism, who over decades of work, primarily at Haaretz, succeeded in creating a record of opinionated, influential, independent and courageous writing, gaining unprecedented access to decision-makers while at the same managing to keep a proper journalistic distance.”

Marcus, an immigrant from Istanbul who fought in the War of Independence, began his journalistic career in 1950, first winning a prize for an essay in Haolam Hazeh, and then by working as rewrite man and then a reporter at the Herut newspaper. For a few years he was the Paris correspondent for the now-defunct Davar newspaper, and came to Haaretz in 1965, serving as a foreign correspondent and as a political reporter. He had many scoops over the years, among them his 2004 report on the Haaretz website regarding then Prime Minister Ariel Sharon’s plan to withdraw from the Gaza Strip. He retired from writing regularly last year.

Bergman was awarded the prize, “For a series of important and bold journalistic scoops,” ranging from the doings at the Abu Kabir Institute of Forensic medicine to the last interviews given by former Mossad head Meir Dagan.

Eyal won his prize for electronic journalism, “For a series of prominent reports of the past two years” on issues relating to the influence of globalization, included a series of reports on the wave of Syrian refugees in Europe. 

Itay Angel was granted his award for “Making battle zones and distant, urgent conflicts accessible to the Israeli viewer at no small personal risk.” 

The 18,000 shekel ($5,084) prizes will be awarded at a ceremony on December 3.