Israeli Museums Splurge on Collections by Contemporary Local Artists

Between them, the Israel Museum in Jerusalem and the Tel Aviv Art Museum spent over one million shekels on 32 works by leading Israeli creators.

'Asphalt Carpets,' by Fatma Shanan, which was purchased by the Israel Museum.
Fatma Shanan

Israel's two largest museums – the Israel Museum in Jerusalem and the Tel Aviv Art Museum – this week announced investments in Israeli art, with the emphasis on works by young artists.

The Israel Museum purchased a collection called "Here and Now," 16 works by Israeli artists, at a total cost of 712,000 shekels. Included in the collection is the painting "In the Mikveh," by artist Nirit Takale, depicting the experiences of Ethiopian women who are compelled to undergo conversion on arrival in Israel.

Another of the purchased works is "Asphalt Carpets," by Fatma Shanan, which recently won the Schiff Prize for Figurative and Neo-Realistic Art. It is the first of Shanan's works to be purchased by the museum.

'Asphalt Carpets,' by Fatma Shanan, which was purchased by the Israel Museum.
Fatma Shanan

The collection also includes works by Gal Weinstein, Israel's representative at the 2017 Art Biennale in Venice, Peter Ya'acov Maltz, Dor Zalicha Levy, Gilad Efrat, Ron Amir, Tom Pnini, Ariel Schlesinger, Hadar Sayfan, Hillel Roman and Hadassa Goldwicht.

Tel Aviv Art Museum also purchased a collection of works by 16 Israeli artists at a total cost of 373,250 shekels. The pieces include "Human Tissue," and "Decomposition: Video Number 1" by Gil Yefman; "Ishmael," a video work by Nira Pereg; two sketches by Alma YItzhaki; "Opposing Light, a video work by Maya Zak which is currently on display in the museum; "Lucy the Martyr," by Roee Rosen; three sketches by Maya Attoun; two photographs from the series "Calls to Disorder" by Liat Elbling; a sketch by Saguy Azoulay; two video works by Lee Orpaz and "Animals: A Series of Eight Prints," by Shachar Yahalom.

'Lucy the Martyr' by Roee Rosen
Tel Aviv Museum