Study: Israel’s Cabinet Does What It Says

A review of resolutions by line items found a full 65% implementation. Of the 35% of line items that were not implemented, 51% are in the process of being executed.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, center, poses with ministers prior to the weekly cabinet meeting in the Israeli controlled Golan Heights, Sunday, April 17, 2016.
Sebastian Scheiner, AP

Israel’s government has carried through with a surprisingly large percentage of what it has decided to do, found a first-of-its-kind study.

The study, conducted by the Prime Minister’s Office headed by Eli Gruner, reviewed the percentage of cabinet resolutions that were put into force.

Of 82 decisions made in the last eight months of 2015, after the installment of Israel’s 34th government, some 44 were implemented by the end of the year, the study found.

Some 48% of decisions were fully implemented.

A review of resolutions by line items found a full 65% implementation. Of the 35% of line items that were not implemented, 51% are in the process of being executed.

The implementation of 24% of line items in cabinet resolutions has not begun. The status of 14% is unknown and another 11% have since been canceled.

Until now, the government has not tracked the implementation of its decisions. The current government is the first to do so; Gruner appointed a department team to carry out the task.

The study found that it took ministries on average three to six months to implement cabinet resolutions. It also found disarray within the ministries over implementation, primarily due to a lack of follow-up.

The PMO’s demand for greater follow-though led all ministries to appoint officials responsible for making sure they implemented cabinet resolutions.