Herzliya Plans 2,000 Small Apartments in Industrial Zone

The proposal requires planning approval, with the next step being consideration by the district planning committee.

Apartment buildings under construction in Netanya (archives).
Ofer Vaknin

Changes may be afoot in the Herzliya Pituah industrial zone, the coastal commercial area that is home to a large number of high-tech companies and other businesses that share the neighborhood.

The area is bounded by an area of hotels, apartments and a retail complex along the seashore itself, and further to the north by single homes. The Herzliya municipality has now developed a plan that calls for a complex with 2,000 small apartments along with 2-million square meters (21.5-million square feet) of commercial space in the industrial zone itself.

The authority that manages the industrial zone and the city engineering department developed that plan in an effort to further develop the area’s economic potential and to integrate residential real estate in what is currently an entirely commercial area just north of Tel Aviv.

The proposal requires planning approval, with the next step being consideration by the district planning committee.

The concept involves the construction of mixed-use buildings that would have residential and office space with separate entrances. The owners of existing buildings would also be encouraged to renovate them and make them available for residential use. The apartments would generally be small – 40 to 45 square meters in size – and target a younger population. The plan does not call for residential facilities for families, as the intention is to maintain the area’s dominant commercial character.

It calls for expanded construction in the area, including the lifting of the current five-story height limitations in the industrial zone. Down the line, the plan calls for buildings of up to 30 stories in height on main thoroughfares, with a height limitation of 10 stories on side streets.

The plan’s proponents say the proposal is designed to make more efficient use of land and curb traffic in the area to some extent by enabling people working in the area to also live there.