Ex-pat Who Called on Israelis to Move to Berlin Is Returning to Israel

'Israelis have all the energy and strength necessary to make Israel a better place for many more people,' says the man behind the Facebook page that caused a storm.

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An Israeli protester wears an 'I love Berlin' T-shirt at a Tel Aviv rally.
An Israeli protester wears an 'I love Berlin' T-shirt at a Tel Aviv rally.Credit: Tomer Appelbaum

One week after revealing his identity, the Israeli émigré who sparked the "Milky protest" with his Facebook page urging Israelis to move to Berlin has decided to return home.

Naor Narkis, the founder of the Olim LeBerlin Facebook page, announced his decision on the social networking site.

"I will return to Israel in the coming month," he wrote in a post. "My experience here has greatly affected me. I'm not interested in making promises or pretending that I have the ability to effect 'change,' it's quite possible that I can't. Right now, I mainly want and need to rest, but I hope that all of us together as a society can [change]. We must choose to be a society and not individuals. We must choose to speak, not stay silent. I have complete faith that we Israelis have all the energy and strength necessary to make Israel a better place for many more people."

The Olim LeBerlin Facebook page – whose name plays on the word aliyah, referring to immigration to Israel – was posted anonymously in late September.

The campaign gained momentum and sparked outrage after he posted a picture of a receipt showing the German equivalent of the Milky chocolate pudding snack costing a fraction of what it costs in Israel.

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