Report: Google May Outbid Facebook for Israeli Startup Waze

Google and other companies approached Waze after its talks with Facebook became public, Bloomberg news reported.

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Google is considering buying Israeli mobile satellite navigation startup Waze, which may lead to a bidding war with Facebook, Bloomberg news reported, citing people familiar with the matter.

Waze is seeking more than $1 billion and is fielding expressions of interest from multiple parties, said Bloomberg, citing a source.

Other media have reported that Facebook has held talks to buy Waze for as much as $1 billion.

Google and other parties approached Waze after the Facebook talks became public but none of the bidders are close to clinching a deal, Bloomberg said, adding that the startup might decide to remain independent.

Waze could not immediately be reached for comment. Google did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Waze uses satellite signals from members' smartphones to generate maps and traffic data, which it then shares with other users, offering real-time traffic info.

The navigation app made by Waze, founded in 2008 by Uri Levine, software engineer Ehud Shabtai, and Amir Shinar.Credit: Daniel Tchetchik

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