TechNation / IBC’s Fast Internet Service Finally Gathers Momentum

LogDog anti-hacking firm raises $3.5 million and mysterious Magic Leap opens R&D center in Israel.

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IBC’s Unlimited fast Internet service finally expanding

The Israel Broadband Company’s fast fiber-optic Internet service, Unlimited, which uses the Israel Electric Corporation’s power infrastructure, finally seems to be taking off as it extends service to larger swaths of the country. It initially rolled out service in Be’er Sheva and then expanded to parts of Tel Aviv as well as suburban Ra’anana and Ramat Gan. It now has some 350 buildings hooked up to its fiber-optic network. Another 300 to 400 buildings are slated to be added each month at this point. Some concern has been expressed that the corporate structure of IBC – which includes Cisco and Sweden’s ViaEuropa, among others – could see the players involved pulling it in different directions. Its Israeli shareholders are Tamares Telecom, BATM Advanced Communications, Rapac Communication and Yehuda Zisapel. BATM’s Zvi Marom is pushing for more resources to be devoted to marketing Unlimited.

LogDog smartphone data security firm raises $3.5 million

LogDog, the Israeli information security firm that’s developed a product that monitors attempts to hack into smartphone data, announced last week it has raised $3.5 million in a second financing round, led by the BRM Group. Unlike many other Israeli cybersecurity firms, LogDog’s product is geared to the private consumer. The company’s app, which is currently only available for Android, can be downloaded for free. It monitors, in real time, attempts to hack into the user’s online accounts, including email, and notifies the user. The product is currently capable of monitoring accounts on Facebook, Gmail, Yahoo, Dropbox and Evernote. LogDog, which was founded in 2013, is currently adding Twitter accounts to its coverage and says it plans to add Instagram and other online content providers in the near future.

Magic Leap opens R&D center in Israel

Florida-based Magic Leap has recently recruited 20 to 30 Israeli staff for its new research and development center here. The firm is developing wearable technology involving virtual glasses that will project high-resolution 3-D images, which will merge with the surrounding reality. The somewhat-secretive company raised about $0.5 billion in its first funding round, led by Google and the Andreesen Horowitz venture capital firm. It was founded in 2010 by an Israeli, Rony Abovitz, and is based in the Miami area. Magic Leap’s technology involves the projection of images directly into the user’s eyes, but until the news of its funding surfaced, no details regarding the company’s operations were made public.