Tech Roundup / Your Cat Just Got Closer to World Domination

Overwolf raises $5 million, and it isn't to chase that cat; Yes nears dream of dropping satellite entirely.

Your cat can unlock your brand new iPhone: Their evil plan is coming to fruition. The geniuses at Apple were evidently no match for febrile felid minds molded by millions of years of evolution and persecution by the canidae: It is now clear that cats can overcome Apple's cutting-edge fingerprint Touch ID sensor on the iPhone 5S, which is supposed to protect your phone – i.e., your bank account – from thieves. So while human miscreants may be foiled by the touchscreen security measure (unless they have your finger…), your cat can contact his kitty colleagues worldwide at his leisure, if you're stupid enough to leave the device lying around where he can reach it. And face it, guys, he can reach it. And unlock your phone with his paw. Live with it.

Overwolf raises $5 million: Overwolf, the startup gamers have been waiting for, has raised $5.3 million, not too shabby for a first financing round. Why have gamers – the serious ones at least - been waiting for Overwolf? Because it spares them the need to disconnect from Game of Scones or whatever virtual world they're inhabiting to take care of pesky life issues, such as email. How does Overwolf do that? It enables the player to access other computer functions, such as said email, twitter, chatting and more than 30 other uses, without leaving the game. It can't empty the garbage for you but it can count your blessings.

World Bank invests in DiViNetworks: The cloud-based broadband solutions provider DiViNetworks scored $5 million from IFC, a member of the World Bank Group. DiViCloud service enhances Internet transmission capacities, freeing up congested Internet connections for customers, most of whom are in sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America and South East Asia. DiViNetworks’ CEO Barak Avitbul said the proceeds would be used to fund expansion in emerging economies.

Marriage in toolbar heaven: Global digital media solutions provider Perion Network on Monday announced a merger with the browser toolbar division of Conduit, which will be spun-off from the mother company. Conduit gets 79% of the new company; 19% will go to Perion’s shareholders and 2% will be allotted to employees of both companies. The merger is expected to close in early January. The post-merger company will have a market value of between $800 million and $900 million.

Yes smiling on TV over the national grid: The satellite TV company Yes may expand from its orbiting platform to a very terrestrial one – the ultra-high speed Internet network being laid down by IBC, an Israel Electric Corporation venture. In other words any household connecting to the IBC internet system – which will be available from 2014 – will be able to choose Yes as its television provider. The advantages for yes include not having to install satellite dishes on new client buildings, not to mention the cost of subsidizing converter boxes for new client households. In fact Yes has a dream of leaving satellite technology behind entirely, and to transit to internet alone – sending itself to any screen, from TV to ipad.

Matomy wants money: The digital advertising firm Matomy Media Group is thinking of floating stock overseas, or maybe arranging a private placement to fund its growth, the company's chief executive said yesterday. "There is a window of opportunity. I think in the next month or two we will have to decide where we are going and when," Chief Executive Ofer Druker told Reuters. Matomy, whose clients include American Express, AT&T and HSBC, helps advertisers market goods and services through its network of online publishers, earning a fee for every transaction completed through its platform. Druker declined to say how much the company would seek to raise, other than to say it would be a "meaningful" amount.

With reporting by Amitai Ziv, Inbal Orpaz and Reuters.

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