Golan Telecom, Now at a Mall Near You

Starting in February, the company known for its rock-bottom rates will allow customers to sign up for its services not just via the Internet, but also at physical selling points inside of electronics retailers.

Rock-bottom-rate cellular company Golan Telecom, which shook up the market eight months ago with its low-cost, fixed-monthly deals, is moving to brick and mortar.

Starting in mid-February, the company, which formally was Internet-only, plans to unveil 30 sales points, reaching every major city in Israel.

In keeping with its strategy of super-lean operations, Golan will not open its own shopping mall stands like the other major cell phone providers in Israel. Rather, it will offer sales points inside of major electronics chains Bug and Best Buy Mobile. Interested customers can enter the shops and speak to the Golan representative.

They will be able to register for service on the spot and purchase SIM cards. Cell phones will also be available for purchase at these sales points.

The new sales points will operate in Acre, Tiberias, Afula, Haifa, Netanya, Tel Aviv, Jerusalem, Ashdod, Be’er Sheva, Dimona and Eilat. Sales reps are already being hired. They will not be full-time Golan Telecom employees and will be paid by commission.

Unlike Golan competitor HOTMobile, which has separate offers for customers who sign up online and those who sign up at physical branches, Golan Telecom will sell the same two packages regardless of how a customer subscribes: A package for NIS 10, for light users, and an unlimited package for NIS 99, which is now available for new subscribers at the promotional rate of NIS 49 a month.

Golan Telecom launched its operations in May 2012 and has since signed about 200,000 customers, as the company’s CEO Michael Golan announced recently.

The company refrained from investing in advertising during the first months of its activity but about a month ago it began purchasing billboards, banners and search engine optimization on the Internet.

Nir Kafri
Moti Milrod