Compromise Lets Employee Testing Firms Keep Some Information Private

The evaluation firms had opposed efforts by the Justice Ministry to open up the process and give the results to the candidates.

Firms that work with employers to evaluate potential job candidates chalked up a victory last week in their fight to keep testing results confidential.

The evaluation firms had opposed efforts by the Justice Ministry to open up the process and give the results to the candidates.

Now, the settlement will limit the information candidates are entitled to see.

The ministry had issued a directive requiring the firms to disclose to candidates the evaluation that they give employers regarding their fitness for the position.

As part of the compromise, the firms will have to disclose the basic findings but will be able to withhold details.

In recent years, evaluation firms have grown in popularity among employers as a means of evaluating job candidates.

Prospective employees are sent for a day of testing, and the company’s findings are sent directly to the employers, who pay for the service. The testing participants never see the results.

The evaluation firms have expressed concern that giving the information to the testing participants would open them up to lawsuits from candidates who are not given job offers.

A number of candidates pressed the Justice Ministry to force the companies to release their reports.

In response in February 2012, Yoram Hacohen, who heads the ministry’s law, information and technology authority, ordered the evaluation firms to give the candidates detailed results of their own tests.

The country’s five major evaluation firms went to court to challenge the ministry’s directive.

Tel Aviv District Court Judge Judith Shitzer ordered the parties to try to settle the matter. Last week, she approved the settlement, but it is expected that ministry will come under renewed pressure to revisit the issue.

Nir Kafri