Fennec Foxes Have Secret Babies at Israeli Safari Park

Fox parents had been brought from abroad. Now their bat-eared offspring are likely to be sent away to save the species, after they grow up at least.

A picture taken on November 6, 2016 shows two seven-week old fennec foxes (Vulpes zerda) at the Ramat Gan Safari zoo near the Israeli coastal city of Tel Aviv.
Two seven-week old fennec foxes (Vulpes zerda) at the Ramat Gan Safari zoo, on November 6, 2016. Credit: Jack Guez / AFP
Ruth Schuster
Ruth Schuster
Ruth Schuster
Ruth Schuster

Four rare fennec fox kits have been born at the Ramat Gan Safari Park and are now racing madly around the fennec enclosure.

In fact the playful babies were born nearly two months ago, a second litter to proud parents Penny and Louie. They had remained concealed in a clay plant pot in the Safari's fennec enclosure. But as they gained control of their little legs, they began to explore and were noticed.

Now Penny, Louie, the two surviving kits from their first litter and the newborns all live together, not because of lack of space in the enormous Safari park, but for the sake of creating conditions as natural as possible, explains Safari spokeswoman Sagit Horowitz. 

"Like wolves, the fennecs live as a family," Horowitz told Haaretz, but there is little fear of inbreeding – that the parents would procreate with their first litter. Simply, they wouldn't stoop to that.

"The female and male are codominant like in wolves. There is an alpha male and female, and they only  mate with each other. In nature, fennecs live in groups of typically up to 10 individuals, which is why we are in no hurry to send the offspring of the first litter to other zoos," she explains.

Certainly, they don't take up room. In contrast with the broad dog family, fennecs (Vulpes zerda) are tiny, about half the size of housecat, with a maximal weight – in males - of about 1.5 to two kilos.

Fennecs are desert-dwellers native to the Sahara and Middle East, and are famed for their enormous ears. They can presumably hear a beetle a long way away but the real reason for the batlike ears is to radiate body heat and keep them cool in the burning desert heat.

Another mechanism is the adoption of a nocturnal lifestyle, unusually among the canidae: During the day the fennecs curl up in burrows that they dig in the sand with their furred feet. Their omnivorous appetite is more typical for the dog family, which does not cavil at scavenging.

The diminutive fox has long gone extinct in Israel. Penny and Louie had been flown in from Britain and France respectively, as part of an international breeding program to help the foxes, which are believed to be endangered – not least because of hunting for their reddish-sandy fur, and capturing for the wild-pet trade.

Apropos of which, do not be misled by their adorable mien. Fennecs are wild by nature and make terrible pets unless you want somebody treating you like an inconvenience and junking the house. 

A picture taken on November 6, 2016 shows a seven-week old fennec fox (Vulpes zerda) and his mother with a mouse in her mouth at the Ramat Gan Safari zoo near the Israeli coastal city of Tel Aviv.
A seven-week old fennec fox (Vulpes zerda) and his mother with a mouse in her mouth at the Ramat Gan Safari zoo, on November 6, 2016.Credit: Jack Guez / AFP
A 6-week old Fennec fox, the smallest species of foxes, and a native to the Sahara desert in Africa, sits in the Ramat Gan Safari Park near Tel Aviv, Israel, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2016. Sagit Horowitz, the safari spokeswoman said four Fennec foxes born about six weeks ago.
A 6-week old Fennec fox, the smallest species of foxes, and a native to the Sahara desert in Africa, sits in the Ramat Gan Safari Park , Nov. 6, 2016.Credit: Ariel Schalit / AP
A picture taken on November 6, 2016 shows a seven-week old fennec fox (Vulpes zerda) and his mother at the Ramat Gan Safari zoo near the Israeli coastal city of Tel Aviv.
A seven-week old fennec fox (Vulpes zerda) and his mother at the Ramat Gan Safari zoo, on November 6, 2016.Credit: Jack Guez / AFP
A 6-week old Fennec fox, the smallest species of foxes, and a native to the Sahara desert in Africa, eats in the Ramat Gan Safari Park near Tel Aviv, Israel, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2016. Sagit Horowitz, the safari spokeswoman said four Fennec foxes were born about six weeks ago.
A 6-week old Fennec fox, the smallest species of foxes, and a native to the Sahara desert in Africa, eats in the Ramat Gan Safari Park, Nov. 6, 2016.Credit: Ariel Schalit / AP
A picture taken on November 6, 2016 shows two seven-week old fennec foxes (Vulpes zerda) at the Ramat Gan Safari zoo near the Israeli coastal city of Tel Aviv.
Two seven-week old fennec foxes (Vulpes zerda) at the Ramat Gan Safari zoo, on November 6, 2016.Credit: Jack Guez / AFP
A picture taken on November 6, 2016 shows a seven-week old fennec fox (Vulpes zerda) at the Ramat Gan Safari zoo near the Israeli coastal city of Tel Aviv.
A seven-week old fennec fox (Vulpes zerda) at the Ramat Gan Safari zoo, on November 6, 2016.Credit: Jack Guez / AFP
A picture taken on November 6, 2016 shows a seven-week old fennec fox (Vulpes zerda) and his mother with a mouse in her mouth at the Ramat Gan Safari zoo near the Israeli coastal city of Tel Aviv.
A seven-week old fennec fox (Vulpes zerda) and his mother with a mouse in her mouth at the Ramat Gan Safari zoo, on November 6, 2016.Credit: Jack Guez / AFP
A picture taken on November 6, 2016 shows a seven-week old fennec fox (Vulpes zerda) at the Ramat Gan Safari zoo near the Israeli coastal city of Tel Aviv. / AFP PHOTO / JACK GUEZ
A seven-week old fennec fox (Vulpes zerda) at the Ramat Gan Safari zoo, on November 6, 2016.Credit: Jack Guez / AFP
A 6-week old Fennec fox, the smallest species of foxes, and a native to the Sahara desert in Africa, sits near its mother in the Ramat Gan Safari Park near Tel Aviv, Israel, Sunday, Nov. 6, 2016. Sagit Horowitz, the safari spokeswoman said four Fennec foxes were born about six weeks ago.
A 6-week old Fennec fox, the smallest species of foxes, and a native to the Sahara desert in Africa, sits near its mother in the Ramat Gan Safari Park, Nov. 6, 2016.Credit: Ariel Schalit / AP
A picture taken on November 6, 2016 shows a seven-week old fennec fox (Vulpes zerda) with a mouse in his mouth at the Ramat Gan Safari zoo near the Israeli coastal city of Tel Aviv.
A seven-week old fennec fox (Vulpes zerda) with a mouse in his mouth at the Ramat Gan Safari zoo, on November 6, 2016.Credit: Jack Guez / AFP

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