In Major Reversal, Russian Speakers No Longer Majority Making Aliyah to Israel

Immigrants from Russia and Ukraine account for less than 40 percent of total olim so far this year, based on preliminary Jewish Agency figures, seemingly losing their majority due to tightening of regulations and uptick in aliyah from U.S. and France

Judy Maltz
Judy Maltz
Judy Maltz
Judy Maltz

The composition of immigration to Israel has changed dramatically this year, with Russian speakers losing their long-standing majority to newcomers from other parts of the world, especially the United States and France.

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