Amazon Offering Free Delivery Worldwide, Including to Israel

Online giant launches special deal with no notice, but buyer beware that only Amazon Global products apply and you'll owe tax

Hadar Kane
Hadar Kane
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Amazon package being hoisted; picture blurrily shows man in red sweatshirt in background
AmazonCredit: MIKE SEGAR/Reuters
Hadar Kane
Hadar Kane

Without prior notice, Amazon began to offer free delivery on certain products, including to Israel. The deal only applies to products costing over $80 that are sold by Amazon Global itself, not third parties selling over its platform.

In Israel, the tax exemption on online purchases applies up to $75, so you may get free delivery but will be charged VAT.

Amazon didn't pre-announce the special deal, but rumors about it had been circulating on the Facebook page "Kazeh ani rotseh" – "I need it".

Products under the deal are already on their way to Israel, says the page's manager Benny Buchnik, adding that people who had decided to forgo some item because of its shipping cost could go for it now. He advises Israelis however to make sure that electrical appliances are appropriate for the local power system, 110V.

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