How Blue (And White) Can You Get?

One of Israel's foremost blues and rock'n'roll guitarists, Ronnie Peterson came to Tel Aviv for a short visit in the 1980s, and has never left.

Haaretz
Ronnie Peterson.
Ronnie Peterson.Credit: Dan Peretz
Haaretz

Rogel Alpher, host of TLV1's Journeys, talks to one of Israel’s most prominent blues and rock’n'roll guitarists and performers, Ronnie Peterson was born in Nuremberg, Germany, to an American father and German mother.

His family constantly moved due to his father’s military career. Peterson picked up a guitar for the first time when he was three years old, and started performing professionally at the age of 11.

In the late 1980s, he was invited to Israel by rock star Shalom Hanoch to play a few gigs, but he immediately felt at home, and that’s what Tel Aviv has been for him since.

Playlist:

Chosen from Peterson’s latest album, “Rock’n'Roll Warrior”:

Sweet Daughter Of Satan
3 Minute Monkey Boy
Forever Mine
Helter Skelter
Hey Hey
Warrior

For the full list of podcast episodes, click here

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