U.K.'s May Rebukes Trump Decision, Says Jerusalem Should Be 'Shared Capital'

May says she intends to speak with Trump about the ancient city's status

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May leaves Downing Street, London on December 6, 2017.
Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May leaves Downing Street, London on December 6, 2017. TOBY MELVILLE/REUTERS

British Prime Minister Theresa May said she intends to speak to U.S. President Donald Trump about the status of Jerusalem, which she said should be determined as part of a settlement between Israel and the Palestinians. 

May said the ancient city should ultimately be shared between Israel and a future Palestinian state. She said there should be a sovereign and viable Palestinian state as part of a two-state solution. 

"I'm intending to speak to President Trump about this matter," May said. "The status of Jerusalem should be determined in a negotiated settlement between the Israelis and the Palestinians." 

"Jerusalem should ultimately form a shared capital between the Israeli and Palestinian states," May said. 

Later on Wednesday Bolivia said it plans to ask for a public meeting of the United Nations Security Council after U.S. President Donald Trump announces that the United States recognizes Jerusalem as the capital of Israel and will move its embassy there. 

Bolivian U.N. Ambassador Sacha Sergio Llorentty Soliz said it would be a "reckless and a dangerous decision that goes against international law, the resolutions of the Security Council, it also weakens any effort for peace in the region and also upsets the whole region." 

A meeting of the 15-member council cannot be scheduled until Bolivia formally requests one. It was not immediately clear when such a meeting could be held. 

U.S. President Donald Trump will announce his recognition of Jerusalem as Israel's capital on Wednesday, the White House has confirmed. While the president intends to move the U.S. embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, he will nevertheless sign a presidential waiver delaying the move by six months for "logistical reasons," senior White House officials said in press briefing.