More Than One Thousand Jews Visit Temple Mount on Tisha B'Av, Setting New Record

Activists encouraged Jews to visit the site on Tisha B'Av following the recent tensions in the last two weeks; nine removed from site for attempting to pray contrary to status-quo rules

Jews entering the Western Wall en route to the Temple Mount, August 1, 2017.
Arnon Segal

At least 1,046 Jews visited the Temple Mount on Tuesday, according to Jewish activists, setting a new record for most Jewish visitors in one day. Many more are expected to visit later in the afternoon.

Activists have been organizing a campaign in recent days aimed at encouraging Jews to visit the site on Tisha B'Av, following the recent tensions at the flashpoint holy site over the last two weeks. The fast day commemorates the anniversary of the destruction of the First and Second Temple, as well as several other disasters in Jewish history. The previous record in Jewish visitors to the site was during the most recent Jerusalem Day, marking the city's reunification, when some 900 Jewish visitors entered the Temple Mount.

Police removed nine Jews who attempted to pray or prostrate themselves, which is against the rules set by the police for visitors, and five were arrested for assaulting police officers and preventing a police officer from performing his duties. Activists claimed that in some cases the arrest was carried out violently.

Three Jewish visitors and one Muslim were among those arrested after fighting by the Chain Gate.