With a 'Stylish' Spin on Judaism, a Tel Aviv Synagogue Beckons the Russian-speaking Elite

Contrary to popular belief, interest in Judaism in different forms is widespread among immigrants from the former Soviet Union. A newly opened synagogue in Tel Aviv's trendy Sarona compound hopes to attract some of the most prosperous among them

Send in e-mailSend in e-mail
Send in e-mailSend in e-mail
Go to comments
Congregants at a Jewish Point event.
Congregants at a Jewish Point event.Credit: Maria Troyanker
Liza Rozovsky
Liza Rozovsky
Liza Rozovsky
Liza Rozovsky

It’s the eve of Rosh Hashana in a building erected in the 19th century by the Templers, a Lutheran sect from Germany, in what is now central Tel Aviv. A passerby peeking in through a window of the preserved structure will discover that it’s completely packed. And, unlike other places in the Sarona compound, this is not a place where they sell hamburgers or the latest fashions. Scattered on the tables are High Holy Day prayer books in Hebrew and in a Cyrillic alphabet. Young people, and also a few veteran immigrants, have crowded into the community center and house of prayer inaugurated in late August by Rabbi Yosef Hersonski. Welcome to the new synagogue for Russian speakers.

Comments