Why People Become Homeless in Israel, and What It's Really Like to Live on the Street

He founded a nonprofit to assist the homeless in Israel and lived on the street to understand them better. Social worker Omri Abramovich, 42, learned how to beg for money, ate at soup kitchens, used discarded cartons as covers on cold nights and also made some true friends

Send in e-mailSend in e-mail
Send in e-mailSend in e-mail
Go to comments
Omri Abramovich.
Omri Abramovich.Credit: Hadas Parush
Ayelett Shani
Ayelett Shani

How and why did your relationship with homeless people in Israel begin?

I’m a social worker and a psychotherapist. Over the years I’ve worked in all kinds of projects connected with homeless individuals, in Israel and abroad. Together with my friend Ori Shoham I founded a nonprofit organization called Home Base. We work with homeless people using a model different from the standard one. We have a soccer team made up of homeless men, a choir of homeless women and a lockers project [involving the installation of storage units in which homeless Jerusalemites can keep their personal possessions]. I wrote my master’s thesis in social work on homeless women and I am now completing my doctoral studies.

Comments