What if Israel Refuses to Decide on the Palestinian Territories?

It’s easy to see the quiet in the West Bank as evidence of a magic formula that makes possible indefinite stability. In reality, a one-state scenario is taking shape before our eyes

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The separation barrier, 2015. Dayan believed territorial division would be like 'a Berlin Wall in the heart of the Land of Israel.'
The separation barrier, 2015. Dayan believed territorial division would be like 'a Berlin Wall in the heart of the Land of Israel.'Credit: Ammar Awad / REUTERS
Michael Milshtein
Michael Milshtein

Two conceptions have lain at the heart of the Israeli debate over the territories since 1967. Their leading exponents were Moshe Dayan and Yigal Allon, two leaders of the founding generation who aspired to reach the top of the ruling party and to navigate Israel according to their respective visions. The struggle between these two fused both ideological and personal elements. Both were driven by a clear understanding of the potential impact of the Palestinian question in general, and control of the territories in particular, on Israel’s national security and on its character. However they advocated different interpretations as to the desirable response to the trap that a lack of decision could embody.

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