'The COVID-19 Pandemic Is the Most Uncertain Time Since World War II'

The psychologist and neuroscientist Dr. Tomer Bakalash explains what happens to our brain in situations of uncertainty – and how we can exploit it to our advantage

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Bakalash sitting down, wearing boots, dark clothes and a fedora
Bakalash. “If we become more flexible conceptually, train ourselves to harbor opposites, accept ambiguity... we will be able to cope better with uncertainty.”Ilan AssayagCredit: Ilan Assayag
Ayelett Shani
Ayelett Shani

Please introduce yourself.

I am a social psychologist and neuroscientist, and a lecturer at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. My doctoral degree involved brain research. I am engaged in a relatively new field, called neuromarketing: the influence of the media, and in particular the marketing media, on the brain.

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