In Israel, the Dangerous Concept of the Goy Lives On

Non-Jews were and remain a disruption in Israel, whether they are Palestinians, children of labor migrants or offspring of immigrants from the former Soviet Union

Send in e-mailSend in e-mail
Send in e-mailSend in e-mail
Go to comments
A protest in favor of the family reunification law. The crux of the debate is the very presence of the goy as a disruption in the Jewish state.
A protest in favor of the family reunification law. The crux of the debate is the very presence of the goy as a disruption in the Jewish state. Credit: Ohad Zwigenberg
Ishay Rosen-Zvi
Adi Ophir
Ishay Rosen-Zvi
Adi Ophir

In 1962, an extraordinary debate took place in Israel’s Supreme Court. Oswald Rufeisen, better known as Brother Daniel – a Polish Jew who converted to Christianity during the Holocaust, risked his life to rescue Jews and immigrated to Israel after the war, impelled by a Zionist call – demanded that the Interior Ministry recognize him as a Jew, despite his Christian faith. Refusal to do so, his attorney argued, would cast Israel as a theocracy that associates national affiliation with religion.

Comments