'At My PhD Program in Jerusalem, I Was the Only Arab Around. Except the Cleaners'

Nihaya Daoud is used to seeing eyebrows raised. That’s the reaction she got when going abroad to do a postdoc for two years without her children, and when she became the first Arab woman in Israel to be appointed professor of public health. And she's not afraid to probe the wounds of her community

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Daoud. “Separation is the origin of discrimination and racism in all realms: housing, education, welfare, transportation. There's no need to take that model and clone it in the health system.”
Daoud. “Separation is the origin of discrimination and racism in all realms: housing, education, welfare, transportation. There's no need to take that model and clone it in the health system.”
Hilo Glazer
Hilo Glazer

One of the formative childhood impressions of Nihaya Daoud, professor of public health at Ben-Gurion University, was an understanding of her parents’ feelings of having missed out: Her father had to forgo hopes of pursuing an education and worked all his life in construction, and her mother, an outstanding student, ended up being a homemaker.

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