Gay Orthodox Jews Turn to Her for Help. Sometimes She Prescribes Chemical Castration

What advice is given to Haredi boys who are attracted to others of their own sex? How do you deal with suspicions of pedophilia in the family? Dr. Tali Vishne, one of the most in-demand psychiatrists in Israel's ultra-Orthodox society, isn’t put off by even the most volatile issues

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Vishne. “It is difficult to be both a religious person and gay. It’s necessary to forgo one of them.”
Vishne. “It is difficult to be both a religious person and gay. It’s necessary to forgo one of them.”Credit: Daniel Tchetchik
Meirav Moran
Meirav Moran
Meirav Moran
Meirav Moran

If there’s one thing that’s clear in a conversation with Dr. Tali Vishne, one of the most influential and in-demand psychiatrists in Haredi society in Israel, it’s that with her there are no clichés, no sacred cows and no predictable answers. Her point of view is indefinable, she seems to be both conservative and liberal in the same breath, a groundbreaking woman who distances herself from feminism. To secular ears, some of what she says is grating, but there’s no doubt that it causes the listener to think. This in fact is my experience in listening to what she has to say about sexuality in Haredi society, about homosexuality, about pedophilia and also about the phenomenon of leaving religious society.

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