Cracking the Mystery of Elie Wiesel's Holocaust Memoir 'Night'

After Anne Frank’s diary, Elie Wiesel’s work is the most widely read and studied book about the Holocaust. Yet the circumstances of its writing and its variations in Yiddish, Hebrew and French remain enigmatic

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Elie Wiesel in 1980.
Elie Wiesel in 1980. Credit: Santi Visalli / Getty Images
Joel Rappel
Joel Rappel

In the realm of research and documentation literature on the Holocaust, a special place is held by Elie Wiesel’s book of testimony “Night.” Originally published in December 1956, it is, after “The Diary of Anne Frank,” the book about the Holocaust with the most copies in print and the most subjected to academic research. The book’s extraordinary sales, together with the distinctive character and personality of its author – Elie Wiesel (1928-2016), who devoted his life to preserving the memory of the Holocaust and to teaching its lessons to the world – have long constituted a challenge to education systems across the world.

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