Why the Western Wall Deal Still Isn’t Happening

With no ultra-Orthodox parties in Israel’s post-Netanyahu government, it seemed like a no-brainer that an egalitarian prayer space at the Kotel would finally be happening. So what’s stopping it?

Judy Maltz
Judy Maltz
Send in e-mailSend in e-mail
Send in e-mailSend in e-mail
Judy Maltz
Judy Maltz

Even the most enthusiastic supporters of Israel’s new government knew not to expect much from it in the way of big policy changes. It was clear from the outset that such a diverse coalition – spanning from hard-core settler advocates to Islamists – would be hard-pressed to agree on anything.

With one key exception: the various coalition factions appeared to have reached a rather broad consensus on issues of religion and state. And that consensus seemed unanimous on one issue in particular – reviving the so-called Western Wall deal, which was frozen by then-Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in June 2017, under pressure from his ultra-Orthodox coalition partners.

Click the alert icon to follow topics:

Comments