Twenty Years Since the Second Intifada Began, Why Hasn’t There Been a Third?

Conditions on the ground may be ripe for another popular uprising, but a lack of trust in the Palestinian leadership and lingering trauma from the events of 2000-2004 have prevented it – so far

Anshel Pfeffer
Anshel Pfeffer
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In December 1987, an academic conference was held at an Israeli university to mark 20 years since the Six-Day War. The guest speaker was Bernard Lewis, a renowned professor of Middle Eastern history, who said there were two miracles about the war. The first was Israel’s astonishing victory over Egypt, Syria and Jordan in June 1967. The second was that in the subsequent 20 years, the pressure cooker of tension created in the occupied territories had not exploded. The first intifada broke out days after his speech, sparked by the death of four Palestinians in a road accident involving an Israeli truck in the Gaza Strip.