Insults and Threats: Israel’s ultra-Orthodox Parties Struggle to Adjust to Life in Opposition

Samuel Sokol is a freelance journalist based in Jerusalem. He was previously a correspondent at the Jerusalem Post and has reported for the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, the Israel Broadcasting Authority and the Times of Israel. He is the author of Putin’s Hybrid War and the Jews.
Sam Sokol
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Samuel Sokol is a freelance journalist based in Jerusalem. He was previously a correspondent at the Jerusalem Post and has reported for the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, the Israel Broadcasting Authority and the Times of Israel. He is the author of Putin’s Hybrid War and the Jews.
Sam Sokol

Ultra-Orthodox politicians have amped up their use of personal, inflammatory attacks against members of the governing coalition in recent weeks, as the reality of their fading influence in government becomes apparent.

Politicians from the two ultra-Orthodox parties, Shas and United Torah Judaism, have compared a government minister to a Hellenistic king who prohibited circumcision, accused a Russian-born legislator of not speaking Hebrew and appeared to make fun of a deaf lawmaker’s disability.

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